Namelessness, Irony, and National Character in Contemporary Canadian Criticism and the Critical Tradition

@inproceedings{Carter2003NamelessnessIA,
  title={Namelessness, Irony, and National Character in Contemporary Canadian Criticism and the Critical Tradition},
  author={Adam Carter},
  year={2003}
}
Recent Canadian literary and cultural criticism has emphasized the view that Canadians share no single, definable national identity, other than, perhaps, an awareness of multiplicity and difference and the sense of irony that comes from the recognition of the plural, differential, discursive, and therefore unstable nature of identity itself. Such assertions (proposed particularly in the Canadian context by Linda Hutcheon and Robert Kroetsch) concerning the essentially ironic quality of a… CONTINUE READING

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