Name letter preferences are not merely mere exposure: Implicit egotism as self-regulation.

@article{Jones2002NameLP,
  title={Name letter preferences are not merely mere exposure: Implicit egotism as self-regulation.},
  author={John T Jones and Brett W Pelham and Matthew C. Mirenberg and John J. Hetts},
  journal={Journal of Experimental Social Psychology},
  year={2002},
  volume={38},
  pages={170-177}
}
People prefer the letters in their own names to letters that are not in their own names. Furthermore, people prefer the numbers in their own birthdays to numbers not in their own birthdays. In this article we argue that these examples of implicit egotism are best conceptualized as the product of unconscious self-regulation processes rather than a result of mere exposure. In support of this hypothesis, a study of name-letter preferences showed that people preferred their own name letters even… 
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In support of implicit egotism, Pelham et al presented evidence from 10 archival studies showing that people gravitate toward careers and places of residence that resemble their names or birthday numbers, including exhaustive studies of common surnames and US city names and common surname and street names.
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Investigation of whether people possess favorable attitudes toward basic attitude objects beginning with name initials found no object preference as a function of matching name initials, but a clear preference for brand names starting with one’s name initials emerged.
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