NORTH AMERICAN BLACK BEAR mtDNA PHYLOGEOGRAPHY: IMPLICATIONS FOR MORPHOLOGY AND THE HAIDA GWAII GLACIAL REFUGIUM CONTROVERSY

@article{Byun1997NORTHAB,
  title={NORTH AMERICAN BLACK BEAR mtDNA PHYLOGEOGRAPHY: IMPLICATIONS FOR MORPHOLOGY AND THE HAIDA GWAII GLACIAL REFUGIUM CONTROVERSY},
  author={Seung A Byun and BEN F. Koop and Thomas E. Reimchen},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={1997},
  volume={51}
}
The controversial role of Haida Gwaii (Queen Charlotte Islands) as a biological refugium on the northwestern coast of North America has been widely discussed for more than fifty years. The presence of morphologically divergent subspecies on Haida Gwaii is one of the major lines of evidence suggesting this archipelago's role as a refugium during the Wisconsin. However, since morphological distinction can be derived postglacially as well as in extended isolation, such evidence is ambiguous. To… 
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FURTHER PERSPECTIVES ON THE HAIDA GWAII GLACIAL REFUGIUM
TLDR
This commentary argues that the conclusions reached by Byun et al. (1997) may be premature and an artifact of limited sampling of the coastal lineage of U. arnericanus, and presents sequence variation from the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene for the American pine marten and dusky shrew that may support an alternative biogeographic hypothesis.
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