NEW KNOWLEDGE ON THE ECOLOGY OF SYLVATIC PLAGUE

@article{Kartman1958NEWKO,
  title={NEW KNOWLEDGE ON THE ECOLOGY OF SYLVATIC PLAGUE},
  author={Leo Kartman and Frank M. Prince and Stuart F. Quan and Harold E. Stark},
  journal={Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year={1958},
  volume={70}
}
The history of plague is an eloqueiit example of changing concepts, of investigation in which numerous hypotheses have been advanced, their limitations described, their positive values extracted, and their remaining skeletons buried in favor of new ideas. Known in classical antiquity, in the illiddle Ages, and in the pandemia of the latter Nineteenth and early Twentieth centuries, plague has been studied primarily as an epidemic disease causing widespread mortality in human populations. Until… Expand

Topics from this paper

Reflections on the epidemiology and prevention of plague
TLDR
The Bible (1 Samuel) is cited as the earliest reference to theoccurrence of plague, which decimated the Philistines in 1320 B. C. in Libya, Egypt, and Syria, and the account of the plague that began at Pelusium in Justinian's reign in the fifth century. Expand
New Records of Sylvatic Plague in Kansas
TLDR
Following a die-off of a black-tailed prairie dog colony on the Cimarron National Grassland, in the southwestern corner of Kansas, fleas were sampled from burrows in June 1997 and tested for Yersinia pestis, and 12 of 13 pools of Oropsyla hirsuta and one of two Pulex sp. Expand
INFLUENCES OF INTRODUCED PLAGUE ON NORTH AMERICAN MAMMALS: IMPLICATIONS FROM ECOLOGY OF PLAGUE IN ASIA
TLDR
Studies on the ecology of Y. pestis in ancient foci of central Asia and in western North America are reviewed, where the bacterium apparently has become established much more recently. Expand
The epidemiology of plague in Europe: inferring transmission dynamics from historical data
Plague has a long history on the European continent, with evidence of the disease dating back to the Stone Age. Plague epidemics in Europe during the First and Second Pandemics, including the BlackExpand
Natural history of plague: perspectives from more than a century of research.
TLDR
The zoonotic nature of the disease and that plague exists in natural cycles involving transmission between rodent hosts and flea vectors are among the most important discoveries. Expand
Prairie Dogs, Persistent Plague, Flocking Fleas, and Pernicious Positive Feedback
TLDR
Although PFB has been implied in plague literature for at least 50 years, it is proposed that this mechanism, particularly with regard to flea responses, is central to epizootic plague rather than a phenomenon worthy of just peripheral mention. Expand
NATURAL HISTORY OF PLAGUE : Perspectives from More than a Century of Research ∗
■ Abstract For more than a century, scientists have investigated the natural history of plague, a highly fatal disease caused by infection with the gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis. AmongExpand
Early-phase transmission of Yersinia pestis by unblocked fleas as a mechanism explaining rapidly spreading plague epizootics
TLDR
The scenario of efficient early-phase transmission by unblocked fleas described in this study calls for a paradigm shift in concepts of how Y. pestis is transmitted during rapidly spreading epizootics and epidemics, including, perhaps, the Black Death. Expand
Classic flea-borne transmission does not drive plague epizootics in prairie dogs.
TLDR
The model predictions of the residence time of the short-term reservoir suggest that other small mammals, infectious prairie dog carcasses, fleas that transmit plague without blockage of the digestive tract, or some combination of these three are the most likely of the candidate infectious reservoirs. Expand
Adaptive strategies of Yersinia pestis to persist during inter-epizootic and epizootic periods
TLDR
This review focuses primarily on plague in North American foci and discusses the potential adaptive strategies Y. pestis might employ to ensure not only its survival during inter-epizootic periods but also the rapid epizootics spread and invasion of new territories that have resulted in major pandemics and establishment of plague foci throughout much of the world. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 92 REFERENCES
The Known and the Unknown in Plague1
TLDR
In spite of all the details accumulated in the published records unfortunately read by a relatively few, nobody can answer the great question as to why epidemics or pandemics occur. Expand
Zoonoses as a Study in Ecology
TLDR
The zoonoses can be divided into two main groups: those transmitted by arthropods, and those which are not; only the first group is considered in this paper. Expand
Plague in Africa from 1935 to 1949; a survey of wild rodents in African territories.
  • D. Davis
  • Medicine
  • Bulletin of the World Health Organization
  • 1953
TLDR
The highlands of equatorial Africa and of Madagascar appear to provide the optimum environment for the persistence of plague on the domestic (murine) plane and the high-veld and Kalahari of southern Africa on the sylvatic plane, where Pasteurella pestis finds an environment suitable for its continued survival. Expand
Results of a plague investigation in Kenya.
TLDR
It seems to prove that wild rodents are the primary reservoir of plague at Rongai, which extends northwards to the Baringo bush country, and is bounded on both sides by the escarpments of the Rift Valley, reaches Njoro in the south, and includes the extinct volcano of Menengai. Expand
Murine typhus fever and rat ectoparasites in Puerto Rico.
  • I. Fox
  • Biology, Medicine
  • The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene
  • 1956
TLDR
It is concluded that a reduced typhus rate is not proof of the efficacy of control operations, and it is possible that control was instituted in southern United States after the epidemic had already receded, and that without the large scale control projects there the disease might have followed the same course it has in Puerto Rico. Expand
Studies on Pasteurella pestis in fleas, comparative plague-vector efficiency of Xenopsylla vexabilis hawaiiensis and Xenopsylla cheopis.
TLDR
It was found that bacteriological culture of the faecal droppings of fleas was unreliable as a check on plague infection in fleas and was about twice as efficient in plague transmission as the Hawaiian flea. Expand
A History of Tropical Medicine
THIS is the second edition of a book which was first published so recently as 1939 and reviewed in NATURE of November 11, 1939, p. 801. Volume 1 deals first of all with the history of tropicalExpand
The Flea Malaraeus telchinum a Vector of P. pestis.
TLDR
It was found that Malaraeus telchinum was by far the most numerous of the fleas found on Microtus californicus, and that this flea outnumbered Nosopsyllus jasciatus about 2 to 1 on Rattus norvegicus. Expand
Plague in Ground Squirrels.
  • G. Mccoy
  • Medicine
  • California state journal of medicine
  • 1910
TLDR
Under a wise order of Passed Assistant-Surgeon Blue, who commands all antiplague operations in this vicinity, all cases of suspected plague in persons or in rodents are investigated by two bacteriologists. Expand
Wild-rodent-flea control in rural areas of an enzootic plague region in Hawaii; a preliminary investigation of methods.
TLDR
Results indicate that a reduction of the plague-vector fleas, Xenopsylla cheopis and X. vexabilis hawaiiensis, may be obtained both on rats and within their burrows and nests, by the use of DDT bait-boxes. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...