NEW GENUS OF DORUDONTINE ARCHAEOCETE (CETACEA) FROM THE MIDDLE‐TO‐LATE EOCENE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

@article{Uhen2001NEWGO,
  title={NEW GENUS OF DORUDONTINE ARCHAEOCETE (CETACEA) FROM THE MIDDLE‐TO‐LATE EOCENE OF SOUTH CAROLINA},
  author={Mark D. Uhen and Philip D. Gingerich},
  journal={Marine Mammal Science},
  year={2001},
  volume={17},
  pages={1-34}
}
A new archaeocete whale from the late middle or early late Eocene of South Carolina, Chrysocetus healyorum gen. et sp. nov., is described on the basis of a single subadult specimen. This individual includes: a partial skull; hyoid apparatus; lower jaws; teeth; all cervical, some thoracic and some lumbar vertebrae; ribs and sternum; left forelimb elements; and pelves. The specimen includes portions of much of the body, but while some of the bones are fairly complete, others are damaged… 

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