NECROPSY FINDINGS IN 62 OPPORTUNISTICALLY COLLECTED FREE-RANGING MOOSE (ALCES ALCES) FROM MINNESOTA, USA (2003–13)

@inproceedings{Wnschmann2015NECROPSYFI,
  title={NECROPSY FINDINGS IN 62 OPPORTUNISTICALLY COLLECTED FREE-RANGING MOOSE (ALCES ALCES) FROM MINNESOTA, USA (2003–13)},
  author={Arno W{\"u}nschmann and An{\'i}bal G. Armi{\'e}n and E Butler and Mike Schrage and Bert E. Stromberg and Jeff B. Bender and Anna M. Firshman and Michelle Carstensen},
  booktitle={Journal of wildlife diseases},
  year={2015}
}
Abstract The Minnesota, US moose population has declined dramatically since the 1990s. All 54 carcasses of moose that died of unknown cause or were euthanized by gun shot by tribal or Department of Natural Resources personnel because of perceived signs of illness between 2003 and 2013 and eight carcasses of moose that died from vehicular accidents between 2009 and 2013 were submitted to the Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory and included in our study. The majority of the animals were… 
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