NEAERA'S DAUGHTER: A CASE OF ATHENIAN IDENTITY THEFT?

@article{Noy2009NEAERASDA,
  title={NEAERA'S DAUGHTER: A CASE OF ATHENIAN IDENTITY THEFT?},
  author={David Noy},
  journal={The Classical Quarterly},
  year={2009},
  volume={59},
  pages={398 - 410}
}
  • D. Noy
  • Published 2009
  • Political Science
  • The Classical Quarterly
Apollodorus’ speech against the hetaera Neaera, [Demosthenes] 59, has been the object of much recent study, and the nature of some of Apollodorus’ distortions and the likely counter-arguments of Stephanus are now better understood. This paper looks at one small aspect of the speech where Apollodorus may have been more informative, perhaps unwittingly, than is usually thought. According to the speech, Neaera had a daughter, usually referred to as Phano, whose two marriages and one extramarital… Expand
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