Myths of Timbuktu : From African El Dorado to Desertification

@article{Benjaminsen2004MythsOT,
  title={Myths of Timbuktu : From African El Dorado to Desertification},
  author={T. A. Benjaminsen and G. Berge},
  journal={International Journal of Political Economy},
  year={2004},
  volume={34},
  pages={31 - 59}
}
  • T. A. Benjaminsen, G. Berge
  • Published 2004
  • Economics
  • International Journal of Political Economy
  • Few cities and places in the world are surrounded by as many myths as is Timbuktu. The city was, during the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, an important center for Islamic learning, and it blossomed during this time as a junction for the caravan trade across the Sahara. The main commodity in the trans-Saharan trade was gold. In the later medieval period, West Africa may have been producing almost two-thirds of the world’s gold supply (Dunn 1989). Later, during the seventeenth and eighteenth… CONTINUE READING
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