Myopia and daylight in schools: a neglected aspect of public health?

@article{Hobday2016MyopiaAD,
  title={Myopia and daylight in schools: a neglected aspect of public health?},
  author={Richard A Hobday},
  journal={Perspectives in Public Health},
  year={2016},
  volume={136},
  pages={50 - 55}
}
  • R. Hobday
  • Published 1 January 2016
  • Medicine
  • Perspectives in Public Health
A century ago, it was widely believed that high levels of daylight in classrooms could prevent myopia, and as such, education departments built schools with large windows to try to stop children becoming short-sighted. This practice continued until the 1960s, from which time myopia was believed to be an inherited condition. In the years that followed, less emphasis was placed on preventing myopia. It has since become more common, reaching epidemic levels in east Asia. Recent research strongly… 

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