Myopia, lifestyle, and schooling in students of Chinese ethnicity in Singapore and Sydney.

@article{Rose2008MyopiaLA,
  title={Myopia, lifestyle, and schooling in students of Chinese ethnicity in Singapore and Sydney.},
  author={Kathryn Ailsa Rose and Ian G. Morgan and Wayne Smith and George Burlutsky and Paul Mitchell and Seang-Mei Saw},
  journal={Archives of ophthalmology},
  year={2008},
  volume={126 4},
  pages={
          527-30
        }
}
OBJECTIVE To compare the prevalence and risk factors for myopia in 6- and 7-year-old children of Chinese ethnicity in Sydney and Singapore. [] Key MethodMETHODS Two cross-sectional samples of age- and ethnicity-matched primary school children participated: 124 from the Sydney Myopia Study and 628 from the Singapore Cohort Study on the Risk Factors for Myopia. Cycloplegic autorefraction was used to determine myopia prevalence (spherical equivalent < or = -0.5 diopter).

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