Myco-protein from Fusarium venenatum: a well-established product for human consumption

@article{Wiebe2002MycoproteinFF,
  title={Myco-protein from Fusarium venenatum: a well-established product for human consumption},
  author={Marylin G. Wiebe},
  journal={Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology},
  year={2002},
  volume={58},
  pages={421-427}
}
  • M. Wiebe
  • Published 8 February 2002
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
Abstract.Fusarium venenatum A3/5 was first chosen for development as a myco-protein in the late 1960s. It was intended as a protein source for humans and after 12 years of intensive testing, F. venenatum A3/5 was approved for sale as food by the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food in the United Kingdom in 1984. Today, myco-protein is produced in two 150,000 l pressure-cycle fermenters in a continuous process which outputs around 300 kg biomass/h. The continuous process is typically… 
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