My baby doesn't smell as bad as yours: The plasticity of disgust

@inproceedings{Case2006MyBD,
  title={My baby doesn't smell as bad as yours: The plasticity of disgust},
  author={Trevor I. Case and Betty M. Repacholi and Richard J. Stevenson},
  year={2006}
}
Abstract Disgust is a powerful behavioral adaptation, which confers the advantage of reducing the risk of pathogen infection. However, there are situations in which disgust at core elicitors (e.g., feces) must be modulated in the service of other goals (e.g., caring for a close kin). In Study 1, mothers of infants completed a self-report questionnaire about their reactions to changing their baby's feces-soiled diaper compared with the diaper of someone else's baby. In Study 2, mothers of… CONTINUE READING

Figures from this paper.

Citations

Publications citing this paper.
SHOWING 1-10 OF 30 CITATIONS

Disgust as a disease-avoidance mechanism.

VIEW 19 EXCERPTS
CITES BACKGROUND

The Body Odor Disgust Scale (BODS): Development and Validation of a Novel Olfactory Disgust Assessment

VIEW 3 EXCERPTS
CITES RESULTS & BACKGROUND
HIGHLY INFLUENCED

Body odour disgust sensitivity predicts authoritarian attitudes

VIEW 1 EXCERPT
CITES BACKGROUND

Consumption, contact and copulation: how pathogens have shaped human psychological adaptations

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
SHOWING 1-10 OF 21 REFERENCES

Dirt, Disgust, and Disease: Is Hygiene in Our Genes?

VIEW 4 EXCERPTS
HIGHLY INFLUENTIAL

Evidence that disgust evolved to protect from risk of disease

The anatomy of disgust

  • W I.
  • odor. Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin,
  • 1997

The ddisgustingT spider: The role of disease and illness in the perpetuation of fear of spiders

  • G. C. Davey
  • Society & Animals
  • 1994
VIEW 1 EXCERPT

Behavioral adaptations to pathogens and parasites: Five strategies

VIEW 1 EXCERPT