Mutations in S-cone pigment genes and the absence of colour vision in two species of nocturnal primate

@article{Jacobs1996MutationsIS,
  title={Mutations in S-cone pigment genes and the absence of colour vision in two species of nocturnal primate},
  author={Gerald H. Jacobs and Maureen Neitz and Jay Neitz},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences},
  year={1996},
  volume={263},
  pages={705 - 710}
}
Most primates have short-wavelength sensitive (S) cones and one or more types of cone maximally sensitive in the middle to long wavelengths (M/L cones). These multiple cone types provide the basis for colour vision. Earlier experiments established that two species of nocturnal primate, the owl monkey (Aotus trivirgatus) and the bushbaby (Otolemur crassicaudatus), lack a viable population of S cones. Because the retinas of these species have only a single type of M/L cone, they lack colour… Expand
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