Mutation of KCNK5 or Kir3.2 potassium channels in mice does not change minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration.

Abstract

UNLABELLED Several reports suggest that clinically used concentrations of inhaled anesthetics can increase conductance through noninactivating potassium channels and that the resulting hyperpolarization might decrease excitability, thereby leading to the anesthetic state. We speculated that animals deficient in such potassium channels might be resistant to… (More)

Topics

3 Figures and Tables

Cite this paper

@article{Gerstin2003MutationOK, title={Mutation of KCNK5 or Kir3.2 potassium channels in mice does not change minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration.}, author={Karin M. Gerstin and Diane H Gong and Mona A. Abdallah and Bruce D. Winegar and Edmond I. Eger and Andrew T. Gray}, journal={Anesthesia and analgesia}, year={2003}, volume={96 5}, pages={1345-9, table of contents} }