Mutation Pressure and the Evolution of Organelle Genomic Architecture

@article{Lynch2006MutationPA,
  title={Mutation Pressure and the Evolution of Organelle Genomic Architecture},
  author={Michael Lynch and Britt Koskella and Sarah Schaack},
  journal={Science},
  year={2006},
  volume={311},
  pages={1727 - 1730}
}
The nuclear genomes of multicellular animals and plants contain large amounts of noncoding DNA, the disadvantages of which can be too weak to be effectively countered by selection in lineages with reduced effective population sizes. In contrast, the organelle genomes of these two lineages evolved to opposite ends of the spectrum of genomic complexity, despite similar effective population sizes. This pattern and other puzzling aspects of organelle evolution appear to be consequences of… Expand

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