Mutation Accumulation and the Extinction of Small Populations

@article{Lynch1995MutationAA,
  title={Mutation Accumulation and the Extinction of Small Populations},
  author={Michael Lynch and John S. Conery and Reinhard Burger},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={1995},
  volume={146},
  pages={489 - 518}
}
Although extensive work has been done on the relationship between population size and the risk of extinction due to demographic and environmental stochasticity, the role of genetic deterioration in the extinction process is poorly understood. We develop a general theoretical approach for evaluating the risk of small populations to extinction via the accumulation of mildly deleterious mutations, and we support this with extensive computer simulations. Unlike previous attempts to model the… Expand
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