• Corpus ID: 13217723

Mutant ras oncogenes upregulate VEGF/VPF expression: implications for induction and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis.

@article{Rak1995MutantRO,
  title={Mutant ras oncogenes upregulate VEGF/VPF expression: implications for induction and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis.},
  author={Janusz Rak and Yoshihiro Mitsuhashi and Liisa Bayko and Jorge Filmus and Senji Shirasawa and Takehiko Sasazuki and Robert S. Kerbel},
  journal={Cancer research},
  year={1995},
  volume={55 20},
  pages={
          4575-80
        }
}
The growth of solid tumors in vivo beyond 1-2 mm in diameter requires induction and maintenance of an angiogenic response. This can occur through the release of various angiogenic growth factors from tumor cells. One such factor is vascular endothelial growth factor/vascular permeability factor (VEGF/VPF), a secreted and specific mitogen for vascular endothelial cells. We show that one of the most commonly encountered genetic changes detected in human cancer, i.e., expression of mutant ras… 

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