Mutant Bacteriophages, Frank Macfarlane Burnet, and the Changing Nature of “Genespeak” in the 1930s

@article{Sankaran2010MutantBF,
  title={Mutant Bacteriophages, Frank Macfarlane Burnet, and the Changing Nature of “Genespeak” in the 1930s},
  author={Neeraja Sankaran},
  journal={Journal of the History of Biology},
  year={2010},
  volume={43},
  pages={571-599}
}
  • N. Sankaran
  • Published 2010
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of the History of Biology
In 1936, Frank Macfarlane Burnet published a paper entitled “Induced lysogenicity and the mutation of bacteriophage within lysogenic bacteria,” in which he demonstrated that the introduction of a specific bacteriophage into a bacterial strain consistently and repeatedly imparted a specific property – namely the resistance to a different phage – to the bacterial strain that was originally susceptible to lysis by that second phage. Burnet’s explanation for this change was that the first phage was… 
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