Must cognition be representational?

@article{Ramsey2014MustCB,
  title={Must cognition be representational?},
  author={W. Ramsey},
  journal={Synthese},
  year={2014},
  volume={194},
  pages={4197-4214}
}
  • W. Ramsey
  • Published 2014
  • Philosophy, Computer Science
  • Synthese
In various contexts and for various reasons, writers often define cognitive processes and architectures as those involving representational states and structures. Similarly, cognitive theories are also often delineated as those that invoke representations. In this paper, I present several reasons for rejecting this way of demarcating the cognitive. Some of the reasons against defining cognition in representational terms are that doing so needlessly restricts our theorizing, it undermines the… Expand
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