Must Zhongzheng fall?

@article{Stevens2020MustZF,
  title={Must Zhongzheng fall?},
  author={Quentin Stevens and Gabriele de Seta},
  journal={City},
  year={2020},
  volume={24},
  pages={627 - 641}
}
Taiwan’s thousands of statues of former dictator Chiang Kai-shek have encountered varying fates since Taiwan’s democratisation in 1987. Citizens have iconoclastically pulled down or beheaded numerous Chiang statues. Many have been removed from public view to the rural grounds outside his temporary mausoleum. Those that remain standing are regularly defaced with paint and slogans highlighting Chiang’s crimes. A more carnivalesque denigration of Chiang is university students secretly redecorating… 

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