Musical affect regulation in infancy

@article{Trehub2015MusicalAR,
  title={Musical affect regulation in infancy},
  author={Sandra E. Trehub and Niusha Ghazban and Mari{\`e}ve Corbeil},
  journal={Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year={2015},
  volume={1337}
}
Adolescents and adults commonly use music for various forms of affect regulation, including relaxation, revitalization, distraction, and elicitation of pleasant memories. Mothers throughout the world also sing to their infants, with affect regulation as the principal goal. To date, the study of maternal singing has focused largely on its acoustic features and its consequences for infant attention. We describe recent laboratory research that explores the consequences of singing for infant affect… 
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