Music and speech prosody: a common rhythm

@inproceedings{Hausen2013MusicAS,
  title={Music and speech prosody: a common rhythm},
  author={M. zur Hausen and Ritva Torppa and Viljami R. Salmela and Martti Vainio and Teppo S{\"a}rk{\"a}m{\"o}},
  booktitle={Front. Psychol.},
  year={2013}
}
Disorders of music and speech perception, known as amusia and aphasia, have traditionally been regarded as dissociated deficits based on studies of brain damaged patients. This has been taken as evidence that music and speech are perceived by largely separate and independent networks in the brain. However, recent studies of congenital amusia have broadened this view by showing that the deficit is associated with problems in perceiving speech prosody, especially intonation and emotional prosody… CONTINUE READING

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