Mushroom poisoning from species of genus Inocybe (fiber head mushroom): a case series with exact species identification

@article{Lurie2009MushroomPF,
  title={Mushroom poisoning from species of genus Inocybe (fiber head mushroom): a case series with exact species identification},
  author={Y. Lurie and S. Wasser and Muhammad Taha and Haj Shehade and Josef Nijim and Yoav Hoffmann and F. Basis and Moshe Y. Vardi and O. Lavon and Suliman Suaed and B. Bisharat and Y. Bentur},
  journal={Clinical Toxicology},
  year={2009},
  volume={47},
  pages={562 - 565}
}
Background. Many species of the genus Inocybe (family Cortinariaceae, higher Basidiomycetes) are muscarine-containing mycorrhizal mushrooms, ubiquitous around the world. The few published reports on the poisonous Inocybe mushrooms are often limited by the inadequate identification of the species. The clinical course of patients with typical muscarinic manifestations, in whom Inocybe spp. was unequivocally identified, is reported. Case series. Between November 2006 and January 2008 14… Expand
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