Muscular mechanisms of snake locomotion: An electromyographic study of lateral undulation of the florida banded water snake (Nerodia fasciata) and the yellow rat snake (Elaphe obsoleta)

@article{Jayne1988MuscularMO,
  title={Muscular mechanisms of snake locomotion: An electromyographic study of lateral undulation of the florida banded water snake (Nerodia fasciata) and the yellow rat snake (Elaphe obsoleta)},
  author={Bruce C. Jayne},
  journal={Journal of Morphology},
  year={1988},
  volume={197}
}
  • B. Jayne
  • Published 1 August 1988
  • Biology, Environmental Science
  • Journal of Morphology
Electromyography and cinematography were used to determine the activity of epaxial muscles of colubrid snakes during terrestrial and aquatic lateral undulatory locomotion. In both types of lateral undulation, at a given longitudinal position, segments of three muscles (Mm. semispinalis‐spinalis, longissimus dorsi, and iliocostalis) usually show synchronous activity. Muscle activity propagates posteriorly and generally is unilateral. With each muscle, large numbers of adjacent segments (30 to… 
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