Muscle hypertrophy, hormonal adaptations and strength development during strength training in strength-trained and untrained men

@article{Ahtiainen2003MuscleHH,
  title={Muscle hypertrophy, hormonal adaptations and strength development during strength training in strength-trained and untrained men},
  author={Juha P. Ahtiainen and Arto J. Pakarinen and Markku J. Alen and William J. Kraemer and Keijo H{\"a}kkinen},
  journal={European Journal of Applied Physiology},
  year={2003},
  volume={89},
  pages={555-563}
}
Hormonal and neuromuscular adaptations to strength training were studied in eight male strength athletes (SA) and eight non-strength athletes (NA). The experimental design comprised a 21-week strength-training period. Basal hormonal concentrations of serum total testosterone (T), free testosterone (FT) and cortisol (C) and maximal isometric strength, right leg 1 repetition maximum (RM) of the leg extensors were measured at weeks 0, 7, 14 and 21. Muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) of the… 
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