Multivesicular Release at Climbing Fiber-Purkinje Cell Synapses

@article{Wadiche2001MultivesicularRA,
  title={Multivesicular Release at Climbing Fiber-Purkinje Cell Synapses},
  author={Jacques I Wadiche and C. Jahr},
  journal={Neuron},
  year={2001},
  volume={32},
  pages={301-313}
}
Synapses driven by action potentials are thought to release transmitter in an all-or-none fashion; either one synaptic vesicle undergoes exocytosis, or there is no release. We have estimated the glutamate concentration transient at climbing fiber synapses on Purkinje cells by measuring the inhibition of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) produced by a low-affinity competitive antagonist of AMPA receptors, gamma-DGG. The results, together with simulations using a kinetic model of the AMPA… Expand
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