Multiscale effects and capillary interactions in functional biomimetic surfaces for energy conversion and green engineering

@article{Nosonovsky2009MultiscaleEA,
  title={Multiscale effects and capillary interactions in functional biomimetic surfaces for energy conversion and green engineering},
  author={Michael Nosonovsky and Bharat Bhushan},
  journal={Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences},
  year={2009},
  volume={367},
  pages={1511 - 1539}
}
  • Michael Nosonovsky, B. Bhushan
  • Published 28 April 2009
  • Engineering
  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences
Biological surfaces (plant leaves, lizard and insect attachment pads, fish scales, etc.) have remarkable properties due to their hierarchical structure. This structure is a consequence of the hierarchical organization of biological tissues. The hierarchical organization of the surfaces allows plants and creatures to adapt to energy dissipation and transition mechanisms with various characteristic scale lengths. At the same time, an addition of a micro-/nanoscale hierarchical level, for example… 
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