Multiple paternity in a natural population of a salamander with long‐term sperm storage

@article{Adams2005MultiplePI,
  title={Multiple paternity in a natural population of a salamander with long‐term sperm storage},
  author={Erika M. Adams and Adam G. Jones and Stevan J. Arnold},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2005},
  volume={14}
}
Sperm competition appears to be an important aspect of any mating system in which individual female organisms mate with multiple males and store sperm. Postcopulatory sexual selection may be particularly important in species that store sperm throughout long breeding seasons, because the lengthy storage period may permit extensive interactions among rival sperm. Few studies have addressed the potential for sperm competition in species exhibiting prolonged sperm storage. We used microsatellite… 
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