Multiple ornaments are positively related to male survival in the common pheasant

@article{Papeschi2003MultipleOA,
  title={Multiple ornaments are positively related to male survival in the common pheasant},
  author={A. Papeschi and F. Dess{\`i}-Fulgheri},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2003},
  volume={65},
  pages={143-147}
}
Abstract Several empirical studies have reported a positive relation between male viability and the expression of sexually selected traits, but others have reported a significant negative relation. Using the ability to evade predators as an indicator of male viability, we evaluated the direction of this relationship in a free-ranging population of common pheasants,Phasianus colchicus , which have multiple ornaments and are sexually dimorphic in tail length and in ornaments such as wattles and… Expand
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