Multiple dispersal vectors drive range expansion in an invasive marine species

@article{Richardson2016MultipleDV,
  title={Multiple dispersal vectors drive range expansion in an invasive marine species},
  author={Mark F. Richardson and Craig D. H. Sherman and Randall S. Lee and Nathan J. Bott and Alastair Hirst},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2016},
  volume={25}
}
The establishment and subsequent spread of invasive species is widely recognized as one of the most threatening processes contributing to global biodiversity loss. This is especially true for marine and estuarine ecosystems, which have experienced significant increases in the number of invasive species with the increase in global maritime trade. Understanding the rate and mechanisms of range expansion is therefore of significant interest to ecologists and conservation managers alike. Using a… 
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