Multiple colonizations of a remote oceanic archipelago by one species : how common is long-distance dispersal ?

@inproceedings{Shepherd2009MultipleCO,
  title={Multiple colonizations of a remote oceanic archipelago by one species : how common is long-distance dispersal ?},
  author={Lara D Shepherd and Peter de Lange and Leon R. Perrie},
  year={2009}
}
The indigenous biotas of oceanic islands can only have been established by long-distance dispersal (LDD) (Cowie & Holland, 2006). Numerous studies employing molecular systematics and molecular dating have also demonstrated LDD in cases where the geological setting meant that a vicariant origin for the disjunction was also possible (e.g. see fig. 1 of de Queiroz, 2005; for examples of LDD between continents). However, the degree to which LDD within a species extends beyond one-off colonization… CONTINUE READING
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