Multiple Sclerosis Pathology: Evolution of Pathogenetic Concepts

@article{Lassmann2005MultipleSP,
  title={Multiple Sclerosis Pathology: Evolution of Pathogenetic Concepts},
  author={Hans Lassmann},
  journal={Brain Pathology},
  year={2005},
  volume={15}
}
  • H. Lassmann
  • Published 1 July 2005
  • Medicine
  • Brain Pathology
This historical review describes the evolution of pathogenetic concepts of multiple sclerosis (MS) from the viewpoint of pathology. MS research is based on studies of descriptive neuropathology, performed during the 19th and early‐20th century, which defined the basic nature of the inflammatory demyelinating lesions. Advances in basic immunology and neurobiology, performed during the second half of the 20th century, paved the way for the understanding of the molecular mechanims involved in… 
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