Multimodality neuromonitoring for pediatric cardiac surgery: our approach and a critical appraisal of the available evidence.

Abstract

Brain injury remains a source of morbidity associated with congenital heart surgery. Intraoperative neuromonitoring is used by many centers to help minimize neurologic injury and improve outcomes. Neuromonitoring at our institution is performed using a combination of near-infrared spectroscopy, transcranial Doppler ultrasound, electroencephalography, and somatosensory evoked potentials. Adverse or concerning parameters instigate attempts at corrective intervention. A review of the literature regarding neuromonitoring studies in pediatric cardiac surgery shows that evidence is limited to demonstrate that intraoperative neuromonitoring is associated with improved neurologic outcomes. Further clinical research is needed to assess the utility and cost-effectiveness of intraoperative neuromonitoring for pediatric heart surgery.

DOI: 10.1177/2150135111418257

Cite this paper

@article{Clark2012MultimodalityNF, title={Multimodality neuromonitoring for pediatric cardiac surgery: our approach and a critical appraisal of the available evidence.}, author={Joseph Brian Clark and Mollie L Barnes and Akif Undar and John Myers}, journal={World journal for pediatric & congenital heart surgery}, year={2012}, volume={3 1}, pages={87-95} }