Multimedia comprehension skill predicts differential outcomes of web-based and lecture courses.

Abstract

College students (134 women and 55 men) participated in introductory psychology courses that were offered largely online (on the World Wide Web) or in a lecture format. Student comprehension skills were inferred from their scores on a multimedia comprehension battery. The learning of content knowledge was affected interactively by comprehension skill level and course format. Differences between format increased with comprehension skill such that the Web-based course advantage became greater as comprehension skill increased. This same pattern was not seen when self-reports of comprehension ability were used as the predictor. Furthermore, comprehension skill did not predict course satisfaction. Generally, students of all skill levels preferred the lecture courses.

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Cite this paper

@article{Maki2002MultimediaCS, title={Multimedia comprehension skill predicts differential outcomes of web-based and lecture courses.}, author={William S. Maki and Ruth H. Maki}, journal={Journal of experimental psychology. Applied}, year={2002}, volume={8 2}, pages={85-98} }