Multifactorial genetics: Understanding quantitative genetic variation

@article{Barton2002MultifactorialGU,
  title={Multifactorial genetics: Understanding quantitative genetic variation},
  author={Nicholas H. Barton and Peter D. Keightley},
  journal={Nature Reviews Genetics},
  year={2002},
  volume={3},
  pages={11-21}
}
Until recently, it was impracticable to identify the genes that are responsible for variation in continuous traits, or to directly observe the effects of their different alleles. Now, the abundance of genetic markers has made it possible to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) — the regions of a chromosome or, ideally, individual sequence variants that are responsible for trait variation. What kind of QTL do we expect to find and what can our observations of QTL tell us about how organisms… Expand
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