Multi-modal assessment of on-road demand of voice and manual phone calling and voice navigation entry across two embedded vehicle systems

@article{Mehler2016MultimodalAO,
  title={Multi-modal assessment of on-road demand of voice and manual phone calling and voice navigation entry across two embedded vehicle systems},
  author={Bruce Mehler and David G. Kidd and B. Reimer and Ian J. Reagan and Jonathan Dobres and Anne T. McCartt},
  journal={Ergonomics},
  year={2016},
  volume={59},
  pages={344 - 367}
}
Abstract One purpose of integrating voice interfaces into embedded vehicle systems is to reduce drivers’ visual and manual distractions with ‘infotainment’ technologies. However, there is scant research on actual benefits in production vehicles or how different interface designs affect attentional demands. Driving performance, visual engagement, and indices of workload (heart rate, skin conductance, subjective ratings) were assessed in 80 drivers randomly assigned to drive a 2013 Chevrolet… 
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The findings show that embedded system and portable device voice interfaces place fewer visual demands on the driver than manual interfaces, but they also underscore how differences in system designs can significantly affect not only the demands placed on drivers, but also the successful completion of tasks.
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