Multi-messenger observations of a binary neutron star merger

@article{Collaboration2017MultimessengerOO,
  title={Multi-messenger observations of a binary neutron star merger},
  author={Ligo Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration and Fermi Gbm and Integral and IceCube collaboration and AstroSat Cadmium Zinc Telluride Imager Team and Ipn Collaboration and The Insight-Hxmt Collaboration and Antares Collaboration and The Swift Collaboration and Agile Team and The Maxi Team and The Dark Energy Science Collaboration and The Des Collaboration and The DLT40 Collaboration and Grawita GRAvitational Wave Inaf TeAm and the Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration and Atca Australia Telescope Compact Array and A Pathfinder and Las Cumbres Observatory Group and OzGrav and Dwf and AST3 and Caastro Collaborations and The Vinrouge Collaboration and Master Collaboration and J-GEM and Growth and Jagwar and Caltech- Nrao and TTU-NRAO and NuSTAR collaborations and Pan-Starrs and The Maxi Team and Tzac Consortium and KU Collaboration and Nordic Optical Telescope and ePESSTO and Grond and Texas Tech University and Salt Collaborative Group and Toros Transient Robotic Observatory of the South Collaboration and The Bootes Collaboration and Mwa Murchison Widefield Array and The Calet Collaboration and IKI-GW Follow-up Collaboration and Hawc collaboration and L3 Collaboration and Lwa Long Wavelength Array and Hawc collaboration and The Pierre Auger Collaboration and Almasop collaboration and Euro Vlbi Team and Pi of the Sky Collaboration and The Chandra Team at McGill University and Dfn Desert Fireball Network and Atlas and High Time Resolution Universe Survey and Rimas and Ratir and Ska South AfricaMeerKAT},
  journal={The Astrophysical Journal},
  year={2017},
  volume={848},
  pages={1-59}
}
On 2017 August 17 a binary neutron star coalescence candidate (later designated GW170817) with merger time 12:41:04 UTC was observed through gravitational waves by the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo detectors. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor independently detected a gamma-ray burst (GRB 170817A) with a time delay of $\sim 1.7\,{\rm{s}}$ with respect to the merger time. From the gravitational-wave signal, the source was initially localized to a sky region of 31 deg2 at a luminosity distance… 

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