Mucosal capillary thrombi in rectal biopsies

@article{Dhillon1992MucosalCT,
  title={Mucosal capillary thrombi in rectal biopsies},
  author={A. Dhillon and A. Anthony and R. Sim and A. Wakefield and E. Sankey and M. Hudson and M. Allison and R. Pounder},
  journal={Histopathology},
  year={1992},
  volume={21}
}
We studied the initial rectal biopsy from 46 patients in whom subsequent follow‐up established the diagnosis of either self‐limited colitis or inflammatory bowel disease. An additional 12 non‐inflamed rectal biopsies were also studied. There was between 2 and 8 years of follow‐up in each of these cases. Staining for fibrin (MSB, fibrinogen), platelets (factor XIIIA, Y2/51), and capillary basement membrane (reticulin, collagen 4) was performed to identify thrombotic material within capillaries… Expand
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