MtDNA from extinct Tainos and the peopling of the Caribbean

@article{LaluezaFox2001MtDNAFE,
  title={MtDNA from extinct Tainos and the peopling of the Caribbean},
  author={Carles Lalueza-Fox and Fernando Calderon and Francesc Calafell and Bernal Morera and Jaume Bertranpetit},
  journal={Annals of Human Genetics},
  year={2001},
  volume={65}
}
Tainos and Caribs were the inhabitants of the Caribbean when Columbus reached the Americas; both human groups became extinct soon after contact, decimated by the Spaniards and the diseases they brought. Samples belonging to pre‐Columbian Taino Indians from the La Caleta site (Dominican Republic) have been analyzed, in order to ascertain the genetic affinities of these groups in relation to present‐day Amerinds, and to reconstruct the genetic and demographic events that took place during the… 
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