Moyamoya: defining current knowledge gaps

@article{Ganesan2015MoyamoyaDC,
  title={Moyamoya: defining current knowledge gaps},
  author={Vijeya Ganesan and Edward R. Smith},
  journal={Developmental Medicine \& Child Neurology},
  year={2015},
  volume={57}
}
Moyamoya is a cerebrovascular arteriopathy, first described exclusively in Japan and East Asia but now increasingly recognized and diagnosed around the world. The condition was initially defined by radiographic criteria of ‘bilateral occlusive disease of the terminal internal carotid or proximal middle cerebral arteries and basal collaterals’. These findings often heralded a relentlessly progressive course, with recurrent multiple strokes leading to severe morbidity or death. To date, moyamoya… 
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