Moving in Dim Light: Behavioral and Visual Adaptations in Nocturnal Ants.

@article{Narendra2017MovingID,
  title={Moving in Dim Light: Behavioral and Visual Adaptations in Nocturnal Ants.},
  author={Ajay Narendra and J Frances Kamhi and Yuri Ogawa},
  journal={Integrative and comparative biology},
  year={2017},
  volume={57 5},
  pages={
          1104-1116
        }
}
Visual navigation is a benchmark information processing task that can be used to identify the consequence of being active in dim-light environments. Visual navigational information that animals use during the day includes celestial cues such as the sun or the pattern of polarized skylight and terrestrial cues such as the entire panorama, canopy pattern, or significant salient features in the landscape. At night, some of these navigational cues are either unavailable or are significantly dimmer… CONTINUE READING
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