Moving Colors in the Lime Light

@article{Dobkins2000MovingCI,
  title={Moving Colors in the Lime Light},
  author={Karen R. Dobkins},
  journal={Neuron},
  year={2000},
  volume={25},
  pages={15-18}
}
The ability of humans and macaques to perceive color arises from the existence of three types of cone photore-ceptors in the eye, which are maximally sensitive to long (L), medium (M), and short (S) wavelengths of light. The signals from the L, M, and S cones are thought to be combined at the postreceptoral level to form three inde-The degree to which the primate motion system makes pendent color " channels " (Figure 1; reviewed by Kaiser use of object color has been an issue of long-standing… CONTINUE READING
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