Move it or lose it—Is stimulation of the vestibular system necessary for normal spatial memory?

@article{Smith2010MoveIO,
  title={Move it or lose it—Is stimulation of the vestibular system necessary for normal spatial memory?},
  author={Paul F. Smith and Cynthia L. Darlington and Yiwen Zheng},
  journal={Hippocampus},
  year={2010},
  volume={20}
}
Studies in both experimental animals and human patients have demonstrated that peripheral vestibular lesions, especially bilateral lesions, are associated with spatial memory impairment that is long‐lasting and may even be permanent. Electrophysiological evidence from animals indicates that bilateral vestibular loss causes place cells and theta activity to become dysfunctional; the most recent human evidence suggests that the hippocampus may cause atrophy in patients with bilateral vestibular… Expand
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