Mouthpart Morphology of Gammarus roeselii Compared to a Successful Invader, Dikerogammarus villosus (Amphipoda)

@inproceedings{Mayer2009MouthpartMO,
  title={Mouthpart Morphology of Gammarus roeselii Compared to a Successful Invader, Dikerogammarus villosus (Amphipoda)},
  author={Gerd Mayer and Gerhard Maier and Andreas Maas and Dieter Waloszek},
  year={2009}
}
Abstract Until about 20 years ago, the well-established gammarid amphipod Gammarus roeselii, originating from the Balkan Peninsula, was widespread and often the dominant amphipod species in rivers, canals, and big lakes of Germany and adjacent countries. Since 1989 Dikerogammarus villosus, a Ponto-Caspian pontogammarid, has successfully invaded the aquatic systems of mid and western Europe reducing and even eliminating native and earlier established gammarideans including G. roeselii. Field… 
Mouthpart Morphology of Three Sympatric Native and Nonnative Gammaridean Species: Gammarus pulex, G. fossarum, and Echinogammarus berilloni (Crustacea: Amphipoda)
TLDR
The hypothesis was that differences in the mode of feeding of the three species could be the reason for their coexistence and that these differences would be expressed in differences in mouthpart morphology, and the results of the SEM study demonstrate that there are indeed interspecific differences in details of the morphology of the feeding structures.
Dynamics and population structure of native Echinogammarus stammeri (Karaman, 1931) (Crustacea: Amphipoda) and non-native Gammarus roeselii Gervais, 1835 (Crustacea: Amphipoda) occurring in sympatry in Northern Italy
TLDR
It is hypothesised that the population of the native gammarid in this small habitat is supported by a continuous upstream immigration of individuals from the Ticino River, while the Balkanic amphipod G. roeselii exhibits a well-structured and self-reproducing population.
Is Dikerogammarus villosus (Crustacea, Gammaridae) a ‘killer shrimp’ in the River Rhine system?
TLDR
This investigation of the relevance of D. villosus predation in the River Rhine system is reported using both stable isotope analyses of δ13C and δ15N, and molecular analyses of the gut contents with group-specific primers aiming at macroinvertebrate prey taxa, which indicate minor importance of predation by D.villosus.
Behavioral interactions between Tritaeta gibbosa (crustacea, amphipoda) and Ocnus planci (echinodermata, holothuroidea)
TLDR
Interactions between Tritaeta gibbosa and the holothurian Ocnus planci are examined in order to clarify the mechanisms behind settlement and pit formation, placement and location, as well as the amphipod's morphological adaptations to this peculiar life style.
Mouthpart morphology of Synurella ambulans (F. Muller, 1846) (Amphipoda, Crangonyctidae)
TLDR
The morphology of the mouthparts and other structures involved in food acquisition of Synurella ambulans was studied using scanning electron microscopy and conclusions are drawn regarding the food spectrum of S. ambulans.
Trophic preference and preliminary indication of phylloplane fungal influence on the diet of the non-native Gammarus roeselii Gervais 1835 ( Amphipoda, Gammaridae ) in the sub-lacustrine Ticino river basin (Lombardy, Northern Italy)
TLDR
Results of the short-term experiment suggest that aquatic plants are less palatable than allocthonous detritus, probably because they can contain secondary metabolites (i.e. tannins) and they have lower nutrient tissues with very high water content, but G. roeselii showed a clear preference for the oak leaves, resulted colonized by a more abundant fungal biomass and, therefore, more palatable too.
Morphology of the mouthparts and digestive system in two species of Uristidae Hurley, 1963 (Amphipoda: Lysianassoidea)
TLDR
Examination of the mouthparts and the digestive apparatus of two common species of Uristidae, Anonyx nugax and Tmetonyx cicada, uses light and scanning electron microscopy to assess morphological modifications that can reflect the feeding habits and to reveal characters that can be useful for taxonomy.
Different ammonia tolerances may facilitate spatial coexistence of Gammarus roeselii and the strong invader Dikerogammarus villosus
TLDR
Although the mortality rates of the two species did not significantly differ, G. roeselii was more tolerant to ammonia with regard to precopula disruption, egg mortality, and microhabitat choice, which indicated that the distribution of the invasive D. villosus was limited at high ammonia concentrations.
No evidence for intraguild predation of Dikerogammarus villosus (Sowinsky, 1894) at an invasion front in the Untere Lorze, Switzerland
TLDR
Investigation of the trophic annidation of the invasive D. villosus in a benthic food web in one season in 2011, focusing especially on the relevance of IGP at an invasion front in Switzerland, combined stable isotope analyses with molecular analysis.
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