Corpus ID: 15421556

Mouth breathing: adverse effects on facial growth, health, academics, and behavior.

@article{Jefferson2010MouthBA,
  title={Mouth breathing: adverse effects on facial growth, health, academics, and behavior.},
  author={Y. Jefferson},
  journal={General dentistry},
  year={2010},
  volume={58 1},
  pages={
          18-25; quiz 26-7, 79-80
        }
}
The vast majority of health care professionals are unaware of the negative impact of upper airway obstruction (mouth breathing) on normal facial growth and physiologic health. Children whose mouth breathing is untreated may develop long, narrow faces, narrow mouths, high palatal vaults, dental malocclusion, gummy smiles, and many other unattractive facial features, such as skeletal Class II or Class III facial profiles. These children do not sleep well at night due to obstructed airways; this… Expand
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Over all, mouth breathers had longer faces with narrower maxillae and retrognathic jaws, which supports previous claims that nasal airway obstruction is associated with aberrant facial growth. Expand
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