Mouse dominant lethal and sperm abnormality studies with combined exposure to X-rays and mitomycin C.

@article{Dobrzyska1994MouseDL,
  title={Mouse dominant lethal and sperm abnormality studies with combined exposure to X-rays and mitomycin C.},
  author={Małgorzata Dobrzyńska and Antoni K. Gajewski},
  journal={Mutation research},
  year={1994},
  volume={306 2},
  pages={
          203-9
        }
}
The induction of dominant lethal effects and sperm abnormalities in Pzh:Swiss male mice after treatments with X-rays and mitomycin C (MMC) was investigated. Combinations of high (1.00 Gy + 5.25 mg/kg bw MMC) and low (0.25 Gy + 1.75 mg/kg bw MMC) doses of both agents were used. Exposure to high doses of X-rays + MMC induced an increased rate of dominant lethal mutations in spermatogonia and late spermatocytes. Combined treatment with low doses of X-rays and MMC was not mutagenic in any stage of… Expand
Induction of micronuclei in mouse bone marrow after combined X‐rays‐cyclophosphamide and X‐rays‐mitomycin C treatments
TLDR
The induction of micronuclei in polychromatic erythrocytes of bone marrow of Pzh:SWISS mice after combined treatment with X-rays and cyclophosphamide (CP) or X-ray and mitomycin C (MMC) were investigated and mutagenic effects were found. Expand
Induction of micronuclei in bone marrow and sperm head abnormalities after combined exposure of mice to low doses of X-rays and acrylamide.
TLDR
The results confirmed the sensitivity to damage of spermatozoa and late spermatids, which can be demonstrated by sperm head abnormalities and reduced fertility, by using a bone-marrow micronucleus test and a sperm morphology test. Expand
Reproductive effects after exposure of male mice to vincristine and to a combination of X-rays and vincristine.
TLDR
The results of this study demonstrated the reproductive genotoxicity of VCR with or without X-rays, but did not unequivocally confirm their ability to cause external malformations in offspring. Expand
DNA damage in human and mouse spermatozoa after in vitro-irradiation assessed by the comet assay.
TLDR
This work shows that the comet assay represents a new method for examining DNA damage in spermatozoa and should be evaluated for use in reproductive toxicity testing. Expand
Primordial germ cell-derived embryonic germ cells of the mouse-in vitro model for cytotoxicity studies with chemical mutagens.
TLDR
Estimates of the concentrations resulting in vitro in a 50% decrease in cell survival demonstrated that EG-1 cells were more sensitive to the toxic effects of ENU, MNNG and MMC than D3 and P19 cells and, with the exception of MNNg, also more sensitive than EPI-7 cells. Expand
A diffusible resistance factor(s) in spontaneous mitomycin resistant mammalian cancer cells.
TLDR
A Mitomycin C (MMC)-resistant mouse breast cancer cell subline is developed from FM3A parent cells(W-FM3A) by continuous exposure to a concentration of 0.01 microgram/ml MMC for over two months. Expand
Detection of induced male germline mutation: correlations and comparisons between traditional germline mutation assays, transgenic rodent assays and expanded simple tandem repeat instability assays.
TLDR
The data suggest that ESTR and TGR assays are generally comparable with SL in detecting germline mutagenicity induced by alkylating agents and radiation, though TGR offered less sensitivity than ESTR in some cases. Expand
Detection of Effects on Male Reproduction—A Literature Survey
TLDR
The results of the examination of 117 substances or substance classes support the view that histopathology and organ weight analysis provide the best general-purpose means of detecting substances with the potential to affect male fertility. Expand
Mutagenic properties of anticancer drugs
Anticancer drugs are among the earliest recognized and strongest mutagens. They have been extensively studied. For example, mustard gas is a sulphur mustard that was widely used as a poison gas inExpand
Reproductive Toxicology
TLDR
It has been hypothesized that environmental estrogens may play a role in the decrease of human semen quantity and quality of human sperm during the last 50 years and testing this hypothesis will require testing the identification of a single causal agent. Expand
...
1
2
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 33 REFERENCES
Induction of dominant lethal mutations by combined X-ray-acrylamide treatment in male mice.
The induction of mutations following combined treatment with acrylamide (AA) plus X-rays has been determined using the dominant lethal mutations test in Pzh:SFISS male mice. Combinations of aExpand
Comparison of radiation-and chemically-induced dominant lethal mutations in male mice.
  • U. Ehling
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Mutation research
  • 1971
TLDR
The frequency of radiation-induced dominant lethal mutations in postspermatogonial stages was dose-dependent, and the absence of induced mutations in spermatozoa and late spermatids was typical for the sPermatogenic response after treatment with mytomycin C. Expand
Morphological and cytogenetic studies of dominant lethality induced by mitomycin C and cyclophosphamide in female germ cells. The use of Robertsonian translocations as a 'marker system' to identify the zygote pronuclei.
TLDR
The increase in rate of postimplantation loss obtained in the dominant lethal test with the low dose of mitomycin C was not due to clastogenic effects of this compound in the female germ cells, but rather to indirect effects on the maternal organism. Expand
Detection of X-ray induced dominant lethal mutations in mice: an in vitro approach.
TLDR
Observations indicate that in vitro analysis permits a more detailed description of mutations that are expressed as preimplantation failures than does in vivo analysis. Expand
Induction of specific-locus and dominant-lethal mutations by cyclophosphamide and combined cyclophosphamide-radiation treatment in male mice.
TLDR
The distribution of the observed mutations among the 7 loci and their viability supports the hypothesis that these mutations were induced by radiation rather than by cyclophosphamide, which causes an immediate inhibition of DNA and RNA synthesis in spermatogonia. Expand
Abnormalities in the shape of murine sperm after acute testicular x-irradiation.
TLDR
The fraction of abnormal sperm at 5 weeks following graded doses of radiation from 0–300 rad increased from control values to 30%. Expand
Dose-response relationship for X-ray induced dominant lethal mutations detected in mouse embryos in vitro.
X-Irradiated male mice sired offspring that expressed dominant lethal mutations during development in vitro. These mutations were expressed as arrest of the embryo either before or after blastocystExpand
Effects of X-irradiation on the kinetics of abnormal sperm production and sperm loss in the mouse.
  • G. C. Pogany
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of reproduction and fertility
  • 1987
TLDR
The synchrony that existed among the various organs in terms of both sperm loss and the generation of abnormal spermatozoa may be the result of a rapid dispersion of gametes from the testis and not due to local responses as would be expected if sperm flow were affected by the irradiation. Expand
Differential spermatogenic response of mice to the induction of mutations by antineoplastic drugs.
  • U. Ehling
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Mutation research
  • 1974
TLDR
The differential spermatogonic response of mice to the induction of mutations is very likely due to the different mode of action of the chemical mutagens and their distinct effects on the structural and macromolecular changes during the development of the germ cells. Expand
Genetic effects of combined chemical-X-ray treatments in male mouse germ cells.
  • B. Cattanach, C. Rasberry
  • Biology, Medicine
  • International journal of radiation biology and related studies in physics, chemistry, and medicine
  • 1987
TLDR
Several studies have shown that the yield of genetic damage induced by radiation in male mouse germ cells can be modified by chemical treatments, and enhancement and reduction in the genetic yield can be attained, dependent upon the interval between treatments. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
...