Mountain pine beetle and forest carbon feedback to climate change

@article{Kurz2008MountainPB,
  title={Mountain pine beetle and forest carbon feedback to climate change},
  author={Werner A. Kurz and Caren C. Dymond and G. Stinson and G. J. Rampley and Eric T. Neilson and Allan L. Carroll and Tim Ebata and Les Safranyik},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2008},
  volume={452},
  pages={987-990}
}
The mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) is a native insect of the pine forests of western North America, and its populations periodically erupt into large-scale outbreaks. During outbreaks, the resulting widespread tree mortality reduces forest carbon uptake and increases future emissions from the decay of killed trees. The impacts of insects on forest carbon dynamics, however, are generally ignored in large-scale modelling analyses. The… Expand
Aftermath of Mountain Pine Beetle Outbreak in British Columbia: Stand Dynamics, Management Response and Ecosystem Resilience
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Over the past decade and a half Western North America has experienced a mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) (MPB) outbreak on a scale not previously recorded. Millions of hectaresExpand
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TLDR
The potential for mountain pine beetle to expand its historical range in North America from west of the continental divide into the eastern boreal forest was assessed on the basis of analyses of the effects of climate and weather on brood development and survival, and key aspects of the interaction of mountain pine beetles with its hosts and associated organisms. Expand
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Abstract Large-scale insect outbreaks can substantially alter the carbon exchange of forests. Currently, British Columbia, Canada, is experiencing the largest mountain pine beetle (MPB, DendroctonusExpand
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TLDR
Infested stands may switch from net carbon sinks to net carbon sources but typically recover within 5–20 years, and carbon losses in infested stands are slow as a result of recalcitrance of snags and coarse woody debris. Expand
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TLDR
Examining how the mountain pine beetle is impacting the net ecosystem production of two attacked lodgepole pine-dominated stands in the central interior of BC suggests that deferring the harvest of stands with significant levels of secondary structure could prevent MPB-attacked forested areas from becoming C sources over extended periods. Expand
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Conifer forests across western North America are undergoing a widespread mortality event mediated by an epidemic outbreak of bark beetles of the genus Dendroctonus and their associated bluestainExpand
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Mountain Pine Beetle Develops an Unprecedented Summer Generation in Response to Climate Warming
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The expansion of the mountain pine beetle into previously inhospitable environments, combined with the measured ability to increase reproductive output in such locations, indicates that the MPB is tracking climate change, exacerbating the current epidemic. Expand
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