Mountain Biking Injuries

@article{Kronisch2002MountainBI,
  title={Mountain Biking Injuries},
  author={Robert L. Kronisch and Ronald P. Pfeiffer},
  journal={Sports Medicine},
  year={2002},
  volume={32},
  pages={523-537}
}
AbstractThis article reviews the available literature regarding injuries in off-road bicyclists. Recent progress in injury research has allowed the description of several patterns of injury in this sport. Mountain biking remains popular, particularly among young males, although sales and participation figures have decreased in the last several years. Competition in downhill racing has increased, while crosscountry racing has decreased somewhat in popularity. Recreational riders comprise the… Expand
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