Motor subtypes of delirium: Past, present and future

@article{Meagher2009MotorSO,
  title={Motor subtypes of delirium: Past, present and future},
  author={David Meagher},
  journal={International Review of Psychiatry},
  year={2009},
  volume={21},
  pages={59 - 73}
}
  • D. Meagher
  • Published 2009
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • International Review of Psychiatry
Clinical subtyping of delirium according to motor-activity profile has considerable potential to account for the heterogeneity of this complex and multifactorial syndrome. Previous work has identified a range of clinically important differences between motor subtypes in relation to detection, causation, treatment experience and prognosis, but studies have been hampered by inconsistent methodology, especially in relation to definition of subtypes. This article considers research to date… Expand
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