Motor-learning-related changes in piano players and non-musicians revealed by functional magnetic-resonance signals

@article{HundGeorgiadis1999MotorlearningrelatedCI,
  title={Motor-learning-related changes in piano players and non-musicians revealed by functional magnetic-resonance signals},
  author={Margret Hund-Georgiadis and D. Yves von Cramon},
  journal={Experimental Brain Research},
  year={1999},
  volume={125},
  pages={417-425}
}
Abstract In this study, we investigated blood-flow-related magnetic-resonance (MR) signal changes and the time course underlying short-term motor learning of the dominant right hand in ten piano players (PPs) and 23 non-musicians (NMs), using a complex finger-tapping task. The activation patterns were analyzed for selected regions of interest (ROIs) within the two examined groups and were related to the subjects’ performance. A functional learning profile, based on the regional blood… Expand
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